Thu07242014

News

Obama visits Los Altos area

Obama visits Los Altos area

President Obama made a fundraising stop today at a private residence in Los Altos Hills, an appearance that spurred traffic disruptions, helicopters scouting overhead and protesters. In the wake of his visit, unknown persons, apparently no fans of ...

Read more:

Loading...

Schools

MVLA rolls out laptop integration this fall

MVLA rolls out laptop integration this fall


Town Crier File Photo
Starting in the fall, daily use of laptops in the classroom will be standard operating procedure for students at Los Altos and Mountain View high schools as the Mountain View Los Altos Union High School District launches a pil...

Read more:

Loading...

Community

Generations blend behind the scenes at 'Wizard of Oz'

Generations blend behind the scenes at 'Wizard of Oz'


Altos Youth Theatre and Los Altos Stage Company rehearse a scene from “The Wizard of Oz.” ELIZA RIDGEWAY/ TOWN CRIER

A massive troupe of young people and grownups gathered in Los Altos this summer to stage the latest iteration of a childhood sta...

Read more:

Loading...

Sports

Football in July

Football in July


Town Crier file photo
Mountain View High’s Anthony Avery is among the nine local players slated to play in tonight’s Silicon Valley Youth Classic.

Tonight’s 40th annual Silicon Valley Youth Classic – also known as the Charlie...

Read more:

Loading...

Comment

Pools should be included: Editorial

Los Altos residents should be receiving calls this week from city representatives conducting a survey to determine priorities for a revamped Hillview Community Center.

Notice that we did not say “civic center” – chastened by a lack of public support...

Read more:

Loading...

Special Sections

Looking for life without lows, local diabetic tests artificial pancreas

Looking for life without lows, local diabetic tests artificial pancreas


Photo by Ellie Van Houtte/Town Crier
Dr. Trang Ly, left, reviews blood sugar readings on a smartphone with Los Altos resident Tia Geri, right, and fellow participant Noa Simon during a closed-loop artificial pancreas study for Type 1 diabetics.
...

Read more:

Loading...

Business

Palo Alto law firm coming to 400 Main

Palo Alto law firm coming to 400 Main


Ellie Van Houtte/ Town Crier
Longtime Palo Alto law firm Thoits, Love, Hershberger & McClean plans to open an office at 400 Main St. in Los Altos after construction is complete in November.

A longtime Palo Alto law firm plans to expand into L...

Read more:

Loading...

Books

"Frozen in Time" chronicles harrowing WWII rescue attempts


Many readers can’t resist a true-life adventure story, especially those that shine a spotlight on people who exhibit supreme courage in the face of adversity and end up surviving – or not – against the odds.

Read more:

Loading...

People

RICHARD PATRICK BRENNAN

RICHARD PATRICK BRENNAN

Resident of Palo Alto

Richard Patrick Brennan, journalist, editor, author, adventurer, died at his Palo Alto home on July 4, 2014 at age 92. He led a full life, professionally and personally. He was born and raised in San Francisco, joined the Arm...

Read more:

Loading...

Travel

Travel Tidbit: Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe offers spa getaway

Travel Tidbit: Ritz-Carlton, Lake Tahoe offers spa getaway


Courtesy of Ritz-Carlton
The Ritz-Carlton in Lake Tahoe offers fall getaway packages that include spa treatments and yoga classes.

Fall in North Lake Tahoe boasts crisp mornings and opportunities to spend quality time in the mountains. Specially ...

Read more:

Loading...

Stepping Out

PYT stages 'Shrek'

PYT stages 'Shrek'


Lyn Healy/Spotlight Moments Photography
Dana Cullinane plays Fiona in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Shrek The Musical.”

Peninsula Youth Theatre presents “Shrek The Musical” Saturday through Aug. 3 at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts...

Read more:

Loading...

Spiritual Life

Foothills Congregational: 100 years and counting

Foothills Congregational: 100 years and counting


Courtesy of Carolyn Barnes
The newly built Los Altos church in 1914 featured a bell tower and an arched front window. Both continue as elements of the building as it stands today.

Foothills Congregational Church – the oldest church building ...

Read more:

Loading...

Magazine

Festival features fun for everyone

Festival features fun for everyone


TOWN CRIER FILE PHOTO
The Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival boasts more than 375 craft and arts booths.

This weekend’s 35th annual Los Altos Arts & Wine Festival promises to be jam-packed with fun activities for just about everyone. The eve...

Read more:

Loading...

Going clean, saving green: Solar energy payoff

Photo Joe Hu/Town Crier

After nine trees blew down on their Los Altos property, creating a lot of sunlight, Gary Hubbard and his wife, Dr. Eleanor Sampson, decided to investigate the benefits of solar energy.Here
This is the first of three articles about solar energy. The second article will be published July 16.

On New Year's Day 2006, high winds blew down nine trees on our lot – and house – winds no one in the neighborhood had seen in 30 years. Bad news for the greenery, but suddenly there was sun everywhere and creating electricity through a photovoltaic system seemed practical.

Although I consider myself green, I once read that the savings in the electric bill could pay for a solar-panel system within eight to 11 years – not a lucrative incentive at my age. But with rising energy costs, I decided to investigate just how practical a solar-energy system would be for my home in economic terms.

Cash Flow and Debt

After crunching a few numbers, I realized the payoff could come in the first year in terms of simple monthly cash flow. With increasing electricity rates, it would just get better.

Assuming the cost of the system would be paid by a tax-deductible home-equity loan, and the system would meet all our electricity needs, the only monthly cost would be the loan payment. If that first loan payment was less than our monthly electric bills, then our total monthly costs would be less – immediately.

Any remaining home-equity debt for the full cost of the system would be paid upon sale of the house, just as we expect a remodeled kitchen to return most of its cost upon sale. Since the monthly savings in electricity costs can be valued in dollar terms, it should follow that the cost of a photovoltaic system could be recovered much more quickly than any other home improvement. In fact a new, small, solar-powered home development in San Jose reported brisk sales in February amidst declining home sales and prices.

Our Case

OK, here's how it worked for us. We receive electricity service from a grid of power wires that connect us to a PG&E power station. Instead of going off the grid, which would require buying expensive batteries, we opted to pay the connection costs of remaining on the grid - this allows us to use power from PG&E during rainy days – or weeks.

We send the company excess electricity on long and sunny days averaged through the year – the meter actually spins backward – in return for using power when we need it. We are not billed for any electricity we use that exceeds what we generate until the end of the year.

Given our electric-heated hot tub and the usual array of TVs, computers, appliances and lighting, I wanted to be sure we generated enough power to pay for most or all of our electric needs. I have replaced most incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent lights – we have 30 in the house.

We opted for a six-kilowatt system – approximately twice the size of the three-kilowatt systems cited for homeowners' needs. A three-kilowatt system might actually be a wise choice for small users, as it reduces electric use by eliminating the highest rates charged by PG&E. These are the four-tiered rates you pay when you use more electricity than the base amount, charged at a low-cost base-rate. In Los Altos, the highest rate may be three times more expensive than the base rate – cutting use to base levels results in sufficient savings.

But I wanted to be protected from rate increases and fuel-scarcity issues that continued reliance on fossil fuels will most likely bring. We also have sunny space on our 0.75-acre lot that gives us a 40- by 27-foot exposure for all 40 panels.

Increasing Rates

From September 2005 to August 2006, the year before our solar-panels installation, the combined increase for PG&E's top-three tier rates was 33.16 percent, as noted in our billing statements. The lowest of those three rates went from 17.6 cents per kilowatt-hour to 21.9 cents. The top-two rates each went from 21.6 cents to 30.3 cents per kwh. Since the base rate and the one just above it remained the same, and our use was split almost evenly between the first two and the second three rates, the average increase for all rates should have been half of 33.16 percent, or 16.5 percent.

According to the rate history on PG&E's Web page, the average total rate increase between March 2005 and March 2006 was 14.7 percent – 13.6 cents to 15.6 cents per kwh. However, information from the same source notes a 6.7 percent increase in average rates from March 2006 to March 2008.

Gary Hubbard is a Los Altos Hills resident.

Schools »

Schools
Read More

Sports »

sports
Read More

People »

people
Read More

Special Sections »

Special Sections
Read More

Photos of Los Altos

photoshelter
Browse and buy photos