Sun02142016

News

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues


Graphic courtesy of Don Gardner
Activists claim that a new SFO flight path leaves a “sound shadow” that impacts Los Altos and Los Altos Hills.

Sky Posse Los Altos Team – more simply known as SPLAT – seeks to squelch the noise...

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Schools

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'


Courtesy of Lia Evard
Water by Youth members gave Egan students a chance to carry a 40-pound Jerry can, to see how difficult it is to obtain water in developing nations.

Water by Youth, a club at Los Altos High School, is making a splash by pla...

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Community

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage


Courtesy of Alicia Madden
Sales of local Girl Scout cookies support service projects, such as funding an orphanage in the village of Mto wa Mbu in Tanzania.

Girl Scout cookies – whether you think of them as a treat, a tradition or a diet comp...

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Sports

Scoreless spells sink LA boys

Scoreless spells sink LA boys


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos High point guard Nolan Brennan attempts a shot in Friday’s game versus Palo Alto. He scored eight points in the loss.

There have been several games this season in which the Los Altos High boys basketball t...

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Comment

New 'York' values

New 'York' values


Hughes

 

As we have witnessed California suffer through one of its worst droughts in history over the past few years, all of us, I’m sure, have been keenly aware of our surroundings and have done a small part in trying to conserve wa...

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Special Sections

Getting a charge  out of the Volt

Getting a charge out of the Volt


Courtesy of Chevrolet
The 2016 Chevrolet Volt can be driven up to 50 miles on the power stored in its batteries.

Just five years ago, we wondered in this column what the power supply would be for the car of the future. Gasoline, diesel, electric ba...

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Business

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos resident Ella Roosakos, 11, with her mother, Gail, puzzles over which Gourmet Works sweets to buy as a valentine for Ella’s friend.

The gift-buying rush isn’t exclusive to Christmas. It may jump over...

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People

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

Alan Rodney Mills, PhD, 83, of Los Altos passed away peacefully on Saturday, January 30th, 2016. He was born in Rochdale, England in 1933 and came to California in 1962. He was a proud alumni of Manchester Grammar in England, University of Liverpoo...

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Stepping Out

PYT 'Gets Famous'

PYT 'Gets Famous'


Lyn Flaim Healy/Spotlight Moments Photography
Renee Vetter of Palo Alto, left, and Megan Foreman of Los Altos star in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Judy Moody Gets Famous.” Performances are scheduled Friday and Saturday.

Peninsula...

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Spiritual Life

A time to prepare: Fasting for Lent isn't limited to food

 

Today is Ash Wednesday, which in the Christian calendar marks the beginning of Lent – the 40 days of preparation for Resurrection Sunday, otherwise known as Easter.

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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West Bay offers different approach to "Flying Dutchman"

West Bay Opera demonstrated its willingness to stage a major opera with an experimental approach in its production of The Flying Dutchman, by Richard Wagner, May 23-25, and May 30-June 1, at Palo Alto's Lucie Stern Theater. The Flying Dutchman was one of Wagner's first big hits, premiering in Dresden, in 1843. The emphasis is certainly on the "big" part. It is long, it is weighty, it is makes great demands on it singer-actors, and on its audience, too. Taking an innovative approach to helping the audience envision the setting of the opera, West Bay used the creative resources of video designer Chad Bonaker. During the overture, images of water play on the transparent screen on stage. At other times during the performance, the screen returns to allow images to aide expression of the setting, relationships, and mystery of the story. While the audience listens to a sea chanty sung by the Steersman, it also sees ghost ships with red sails and black mast floating into view. Der Fliegende Hollander (The Flying Dutchman) is based on folklore about a Dutch sea captain, Philip Vanderdecken, who is said to have sworn that "in spite of the devil" he would sail around the Cape of Good Hope, even if it took him forever. The devil, apparently listening and never one to miss a chance for a joke at someone else's expense, condemns the captain to roam the seas for eternity, seeking "redemption." There is only one way he can gain it. He must find a woman who will love him faithfully "unto death." Opera goers can hear that as a clue to all that follows. It is also a bit of male-chauvinist piggery on the part of the devil as it implies that such a woman is so impossibly difficult to find, that the Dutchman will indeed be a lost soul until Judgment Day. The opera is set in an eighteenth century Norwegian sea port. The colorful costumes, designed by Callie Floor, enliven the stage and add a sense of historical place to the strange ghost story of the opera. Fortunately for the Dutchman and for West Bay Opera, Senta, the pure though slightly dippy woman who loves the Dutchman even before they meet, was portrayed on opening night by Paula Goodman Wilder. Her singing was strong and beautiful. She captured the difficult music and characterization securely enough to insure redemption of the Dutchman and of the whole presentation. The Flying Dutchman is a good match for the Bay Area. Our focus now is more on freeways and parking spaces, but much of the area, especially San Francisco, of course, came into being, at about the time the opera premiered, because of sea ports. In the opera, when the ships are tied to the dock, the sailors are greeted by their wives and sweethearts. When the sailors and townfolk invite the crew of the Dutchman's ship to join in the revelry, they hear voices from inside the mysterious ship with red sails. Those sailors sing about their damnation to the eternal voyage. This puts a stop to the partying. As is often the case in opera, even a happy ending is not exactly happy. Senta proves her devotion by jumping into the sea to her death. The Dutchman prepares to set off again, but, fortunately, his ship sinks. Senta and the Dutchman are joined together forever, rising toward heaven. The ending of the opera offers a challenging problem for staging. How should the transfiguration and rising to heaven be shown? Should it be shown at all? Director David F. Ostwald chose to use the screen with pictures of the now heavenly pair seen first very small as though far away and then growing bigger as though coming closer, as the other performers pointed heavenward from behind the screen. This was in keeping with the choice to employ video techniques as a visual theme for the production, and yet might have been both more and less literal than necessary. Transfiguration, however, not having been witnessed, how to suggest it at all may be more than even the greatest stagecraft can attain. West Bay Opera casts outstanding professional singers in leading roles and similarly outstanding amateurs in chorus and smaller roles. The Flying Dutchman was double-cast with the extraordinary, powerful Douglas Nagel on opening night, and Bryan Glenn Davis playing The Dutchman, Ms. Goodman Wilder and Gail Sullivan as Senta. John Bischoff and Peter Graham portrayed Daland, Senta's avaricious father; Ben Bongers and Vincent Chambers portrayed Erik, Senta's more normal suitor. Donna Olsen and Sally Mouzon sang the role of Mary, a leader of the local ladies who sings while they spin. West Bay's General Director, Jose Luis Moscovich conducted, Mr. Ostwald directed, and sets with realistic ships and interiors were designed by Peter Crompton. He also designed the nautical images. The performance was sung in German with the excellent English supertitles easy to see on either side of the stage, making the grand, spooky opera accessible to all.

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