Mon02082016

News

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds

Mountain View braces for Super Bowl crowds


Graphic Courtesy of City of Mountain View
The purple parking lots above indicate where paid parking for the Super Bowl is allowed in downtown Mountain View. Other lots are open but still carry three-hour time constraints.

Downtown Mountain View wil...

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Schools

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school

Los Altos High student hopes to bring animal therapy to school


Courtesy of Christine Lenz
Los Altos High junior Riley Fujioka, left, works with Animal Assisted Happiness program manager Simone Haroush-van Dam.

Research affirms that the therapeutic effects of animals help reduce stress in humans, and one Los Alt...

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Community

Sports

Panthers outpace Priory

Panthers outpace Priory


Shirley Pefley/Special to the Town Crier
Pinewood’s Matt Peery lays up the ball in Friday’s win over Woodside Priory. Peery paced the Panthers with 19 points.

While height helps, the Pinewood School boys are proof that basketball is not ...

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Comment

From the City Manager's Desk: Fulfilling our mission

 

For those of us who work for Los Altos, the mission is “to foster and maintain the city of Los Altos as a great place to live and to raise a family.” The city’s employees take this mission seriously and – individually ...

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Special Sections

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl

'Machos': Middle Eastern nachos ideal for Super Bowl


Photos Courtesy of Blanche Shaheen
Blanche Shaheen, above with her brother Issa, shares her Middle Eastern take on nachos – ideal for a Super Bowl party. Shaheen’s “Machos,” right, feature feta, tahini sauce, Persian cucumbe...

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Business

Businesses on Main Street make moves

Businesses on Main Street make moves


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Several stores on Main Street in downtown Los Altos are in the midst of changing hands.

In the coming months, Main Street will welcome several new businesses to fill empty storefronts.

Jennifer Quinn, the city’s econo...

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People

ROSEMARY FRASER

Rosemary Fraser, age 81, a long-time resident of the Los Altos/Palo Alto area, died peacefully Friday, the 22nd of January at her home. It was a sudden death; hypertension was the underlying cause.

Born in 1934 in Florence, Arizona, Rosemary enjoyed...

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Stepping Out

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'

West Bay Opera tackles Tchaikovsky's 'Onegin'


Otak Jump/Special to the Town Crier
Olga Chernisheva and Silas Elash perform in West Bay Opera’s “Eugene Onegin.”

The West Bay Opera production of “Eugene Onegin” is scheduled Feb. 19-28 at Lucie Stern Theatre, 1305...

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Spiritual Life

How to cultivate childlike faith in a grown-up world

And Jesus said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.”

– Matt. 18:3

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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Journey through CERT: Week 1


Photo By: Ellie Van Houtte/ Town Crier
Photo Ellie Van Houtte/ Town CrierCommunity Emergency Response Team participants in Los Altos Hills train to become disaster-service workers who assist others in their neighborhoods in the aftermath of a catastrophe.

 

Over the next six weeks, Town Crier staff writer and photographer Ellie Van Houtte will chronicle her Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) training. Her experience during week one follows.

 

As someone who’s lived in California for just one year, I’ve never experienced the tremors of an earthquake – or the wrath of any major catastrophe.

With three active faults near where I now live and work, I recently wondered whether I’m prepared to handle the minutes, days and weeks following a disaster. I’m afraid I’m not.

When I began reporting last fall on Los Altos Hills’ efforts to prepare residents for disaster response, I watched in awe as a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) executed a complex simulated post-disaster drill at Foothill College like musicians in a symphony. The simulation involved setting up ARK – an incident command center for the Los Altos Hills CERT team – where a few people orchestrated a platoon of trained volunteers via a series of exercises that funneled information from the town’s 56 neighborhood zones.

The exercise was a wake-up call for me. The danger of an earthquake, wildfire or major storm in the area is real, and I needed to be prepared for it.

When Mike Sanders, the Santa Clara County Fire Department’s emergency services coordinator, suggested that I enroll in Los Altos Hills’ sixth annual CERT class, I didn’t hesitate.

The 18-hour training, which began April 9, is scheduled four Tuesday nights and one Saturday.

When my 21 classmates and I arrived at Los Altos Hills Town Hall for the first session, several trained CERT members welcomed us with a receiving line

Minutes later, we had collected town maps and a 300-page field operating guide, posed for headshots and raised our right hands to become volunteer disaster-service workers. According to Sanders, that oath is important and ensures that any CERT member injured while engaging in official disaster service would be eligible for workers’ compensation.

But any misperceptions that CERT designation gives someone a “go anywhere” or “get-out-of-jail-free card” were quickly dispelled.

“Only do what you’re trained to do,” Sanders said. “Just because you’re a CERT member doesn’t mean you can do everything a firefighter can.”

What is CERT?

Those running the session explained what CERT is – and does.

Although emergency responders and other medical personnel are best equipped to handle challenging situations, they might not be able to reach those in need immediately after a catastrophe strikes. That’s where California’s 150,000 CERT members come in.

CERT members are seen as the eyes and ears on the ground. They play a critical role in securing vital resources and services in the wake of a disaster.

“Your job is to collect as much data as possible, as quickly and accurately as possible,” Sanders said.

After collecting neighborhood data, members forward it to the ARK, the CERT command center. The information travels up the chain of communications – from Los Altos Hills’ Emergency Operation Center to County Emergency Services, the Coastal Region Emergency Operations Center and as far as the California Emergency Management Agency, which operates 24/7.

‘We’re all in it together’

People taking this year’s CERT training are doing so for myriad reasons – some want to know their neighbors better, while others remember the aftermath of 9/11. Two teachers from St. Nicholas Catholic School said they enrolled to make their campus safer, and staff from Daughters of Charity want to be prepared if an earthquake strikes.

At the conclusion of the first class, I began to better understand the value of CERT. It’s more than the backpack of supplies and manuals I clasped in my arms as I left – it’s the opportunity to connect with people who live in the community where I work. I might someday be a lifeline for these people or they for me, in unforeseen circumstances.

CERT supervisor Richard Green summarized it best: “A disaster is something beyond normal … beyond your capacity. … We’re all in it together.”

To read Van Houtte’s Week 2 entry on CERT’s simulated triage exercises and disaster medical operations, click here.

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