Wed02102016

News

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues


Graphic courtesy of Don Gardner
Activists claim that a new SFO flight path leaves a “sound shadow” that impacts Los Altos and Los Altos Hills.

Sky Posse Los Altos Team – more simply known as SPLAT – seeks to squelch the noise...

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Schools

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'


Courtesy of Lia Evard
Water by Youth members gave Egan students a chance to carry a 40-pound Jerry can, to see how difficult it is to obtain water in developing nations.

Water by Youth, a club at Los Altos High School, is making a splash by pla...

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Community

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage


Courtesy of Alicia Madden
Sales of local Girl Scout cookies support service projects, such as funding an orphanage in the village of Mto wa Mbu in Tanzania.

Girl Scout cookies – whether you think of them as a treat, a tradition or a diet comp...

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Sports

Scoreless spells sink LA boys

Scoreless spells sink LA boys


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos High point guard Nolan Brennan attempts a shot in Friday’s game versus Palo Alto. He scored eight points in the loss.

There have been several games this season in which the Los Altos High boys basketball t...

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Comment

New 'York' values

New 'York' values


Hughes

 

As we have witnessed California suffer through one of its worst droughts in history over the past few years, all of us, I’m sure, have been keenly aware of our surroundings and have done a small part in trying to conserve wa...

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Special Sections

Getting a charge  out of the Volt

Getting a charge out of the Volt


Courtesy of Chevrolet
The 2016 Chevrolet Volt can be driven up to 50 miles on the power stored in its batteries.

Just five years ago, we wondered in this column what the power supply would be for the car of the future. Gasoline, diesel, electric ba...

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Business

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos resident Ella Roosakos, 11, with her mother, Gail, puzzles over which Gourmet Works sweets to buy as a valentine for Ella’s friend.

The gift-buying rush isn’t exclusive to Christmas. It may jump over...

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People

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

Alan Rodney Mills, PhD, 83, of Los Altos passed away peacefully on Saturday, January 30th, 2016. He was born in Rochdale, England in 1933 and came to California in 1962. He was a proud alumni of Manchester Grammar in England, University of Liverpoo...

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Stepping Out

PYT 'Gets Famous'

PYT 'Gets Famous'


Lyn Flaim Healy/Spotlight Moments Photography
Renee Vetter of Palo Alto, left, and Megan Foreman of Los Altos star in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Judy Moody Gets Famous.” Performances are scheduled Friday and Saturday.

Peninsula...

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Spiritual Life

A time to prepare: Fasting for Lent isn't limited to food

 

Today is Ash Wednesday, which in the Christian calendar marks the beginning of Lent – the 40 days of preparation for Resurrection Sunday, otherwise known as Easter.

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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Reap benefits of growing your own food

Photo Courtesy Of Wikicommons Gardening takes some skill, but the seeds, soil, microbes, rain, sun and earthworms do most of the work. Not to worry – the worms don't bite, and they help aerate the soil.

Spring has sprung and Earth Day is upon us Friday. If you want to go green this year, don’t stop at planting a tree, attending a rally or donating to your favorite conservation fund. Make 2011 the year you move beyond symbolic gestures and engage with the Earth in the most primal, profound and productive way possible: Learn to grow your own food.

People labor to acquire the skills to make a living, yet many neglect the most basic and valuable skill – the ability to feed ourselves. We depend almost completely on others to provide the nourishment that keeps us alive.

When you ponder the implications in an economy that seems to be hanging by a thread, it doesn’t make sense. For this reason among others, people should commemorate Earth Day by vowing to experience firsthand the miracle of growing food.

A survey by the Garden Writers Association revealed that 38 percent of Americans, an increasing percentage under 40, grew some of their own vegetables in 2009. Many coaxed their children to get down and dirty, also. Approximately 37 percent of gardeners plan to expand their gardens this year.

While these numbers are positive, we should reverse the 38 percent to 83 percent. Growing your own food brings a variety of benefits.

• It’s a source of fresh, delicious and wholesome food. Most list the food itself as their primary reason for gardening. Homegrown food is fresher, healthier and tastier, especially if it’s grown organically. It’s closer to what food is supposed to be about. It doesn’t merely keep you alive – it makes life worth living.

• More satisfaction. Seventy-one percent of young people, and at least that many older gardeners, spend hours on hands and knees near earthworms and ants to grow tasty food and earn bragging rights. The urge originates from an ancient, bred-in-the-bone sense of competence and self-reliance that comes from providing something that everyone needs.

Since becoming dependent on supermarkets, Americans have lost these innate feelings – their connection with the first humans who figured out that a little dirt over an apple seed, water and light would produce an apple tree.

• We’re up for downtime, and digging in the dirt supplies it in spades. Gardening’s hard work, but artificial lighting and air, sitting at a computer, multitasking, constant interruptions and other demands have created a stressful way of life.

The Garden Writers’ survey found that 60 percent of young gardeners said yard work relaxed them. Gardeners work on plant-, wind-, sun- and rain-time, not clock-time. Caring for a garden keeps people attuned to life’s leisurely time frames, not frenetic schedules.

• It’s a spiritual thing. The sacred texts of many traditions refer to gardens. Spiritual leaders teach life lessons using gardening metaphors and parables.

Gardening makes us partners in an ongoing creation. And while gardening can be accomplished alone, its pleasures are amplified when shared.

• It keeps us fit. No doubt, gardening is a great way to get fit. Muscle groups you didn’t know you had become toned in the process of digging, turning, hoeing, raking, sowing and weeding.

• Gardening could save your life. Dwindling global resources, climate instability, skyrocketing prices and other red flags point to a future where inexpensive, plentiful and readily accessible food may no longer be available. If store shelves are bare, the ability to grow food becomes a survival skill.

A society connected to its food production is healthier. Considering the relative ease of growing fruits and vegetables in backyards, vacant lots, community gardens and patio containers, there’s no reason not to get your hands dirty.

Gardening takes some skill, but the seeds, soil, earthworms, microbes, rain and sun do most of the work.

Ellen LaConte is author of “Life Rules” (Green Horizon, 2010). For more information, visit www.ellenlaconte.com.

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