Fri04292016

News

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Loyola Corners economics, traffic rise to top of planning concerns

Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Loyola Bridge construction parallel to the Fremont Avenue frontage may lead officials to alter circulation plans for the area.

Loyola Corners stakeholders last week mulled the issues that will likely shape the area&rsquo...

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Schools

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week

LAHS Green Team commemorates Earth Week


Traci Newell/Town Crier
Los Altos High School Green Team members, above, quiz their classmates about water conservation. The club distributed plants as prizes during the club’s Earth Week activities.

Members of the Los Altos High School Green...

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Community

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition

Local pianist, 11, slated to perform Saturday at statewide competition


Courtesy of the Cha family
Spencer Cha plays piano at a Santa Clara University recital. The sixth-grader also enjoys soccer, tennis, golf and skiing.

Spencer Cha has come a long way since he first sat down at the piano at age 2.

“I remem...

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Sports

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season

Spartans net second place, eye top prize next season


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Jeremy Hsu, Mountain View High’s top singles player, competes against Pinewood Thursday. The Spartans won the match 7-0.

With freshmen playing the top three spots in singles, the future of the Mountain View High boy...

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Comment

Los Altos at a leadership crossroads: Editorial

Don’t look now, but there could be some major changes ahead regarding how the Los Altos city government is run.

The current city council has the opportunity to hire a new city manager in the wake of Marcia Somers’ recent resignation. Fur...

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Special Sections

How to personalize the wedding bar

How to personalize the wedding bar


Christine Moore/Special to the Town Crier
A seasonal signature cocktail adds interest beyond the standard wedding bar’s spirits and mixers. Focus on one set of fresh ingredients, such as blueberries, blackberries and mint for a dose of budget...

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Business

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty

Farmers prepare to market season's bounty


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Journeyman farmer Jen Friedlander waters Hidden Villa’s greenhouse plants, which will grow stronger in the controlled indoor environment before being transferred to the field outdoors.

Around Hidden Villa, the gree...

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People

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

BUOL JOANNE DOUGHERTY

1930-2016

Heaven gained a beautiful angel today. Our beloved mother’s blessed life ended in her Los Altos home surrounded by her loving family on April 18, 2016.

Buol Joanne Dougherty was born Sept. 28, 1930 in Chicago. At the age of two, M...

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Stepping Out

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy  ends run this weekend

'Catch' comes to conclusion LA Stage Co. comedy ends run this weekend


Richard Mayer/Special to the Town Crier
Bryan Moriarty, left, stars as Yossarian and John Stephen King plays the Psychiatrist in Los Altos Stage Company’s “Catch-22.”

Los Altos Stage Company’s presentation of “Catch...

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Spiritual Life

Reap benefits of growing your own food

Photo Courtesy Of Wikicommons Gardening takes some skill, but the seeds, soil, microbes, rain, sun and earthworms do most of the work. Not to worry – the worms don't bite, and they help aerate the soil.

Spring has sprung and Earth Day is upon us Friday. If you want to go green this year, don’t stop at planting a tree, attending a rally or donating to your favorite conservation fund. Make 2011 the year you move beyond symbolic gestures and engage with the Earth in the most primal, profound and productive way possible: Learn to grow your own food.

People labor to acquire the skills to make a living, yet many neglect the most basic and valuable skill – the ability to feed ourselves. We depend almost completely on others to provide the nourishment that keeps us alive.

When you ponder the implications in an economy that seems to be hanging by a thread, it doesn’t make sense. For this reason among others, people should commemorate Earth Day by vowing to experience firsthand the miracle of growing food.

A survey by the Garden Writers Association revealed that 38 percent of Americans, an increasing percentage under 40, grew some of their own vegetables in 2009. Many coaxed their children to get down and dirty, also. Approximately 37 percent of gardeners plan to expand their gardens this year.

While these numbers are positive, we should reverse the 38 percent to 83 percent. Growing your own food brings a variety of benefits.

• It’s a source of fresh, delicious and wholesome food. Most list the food itself as their primary reason for gardening. Homegrown food is fresher, healthier and tastier, especially if it’s grown organically. It’s closer to what food is supposed to be about. It doesn’t merely keep you alive – it makes life worth living.

• More satisfaction. Seventy-one percent of young people, and at least that many older gardeners, spend hours on hands and knees near earthworms and ants to grow tasty food and earn bragging rights. The urge originates from an ancient, bred-in-the-bone sense of competence and self-reliance that comes from providing something that everyone needs.

Since becoming dependent on supermarkets, Americans have lost these innate feelings – their connection with the first humans who figured out that a little dirt over an apple seed, water and light would produce an apple tree.

• We’re up for downtime, and digging in the dirt supplies it in spades. Gardening’s hard work, but artificial lighting and air, sitting at a computer, multitasking, constant interruptions and other demands have created a stressful way of life.

The Garden Writers’ survey found that 60 percent of young gardeners said yard work relaxed them. Gardeners work on plant-, wind-, sun- and rain-time, not clock-time. Caring for a garden keeps people attuned to life’s leisurely time frames, not frenetic schedules.

• It’s a spiritual thing. The sacred texts of many traditions refer to gardens. Spiritual leaders teach life lessons using gardening metaphors and parables.

Gardening makes us partners in an ongoing creation. And while gardening can be accomplished alone, its pleasures are amplified when shared.

• It keeps us fit. No doubt, gardening is a great way to get fit. Muscle groups you didn’t know you had become toned in the process of digging, turning, hoeing, raking, sowing and weeding.

• Gardening could save your life. Dwindling global resources, climate instability, skyrocketing prices and other red flags point to a future where inexpensive, plentiful and readily accessible food may no longer be available. If store shelves are bare, the ability to grow food becomes a survival skill.

A society connected to its food production is healthier. Considering the relative ease of growing fruits and vegetables in backyards, vacant lots, community gardens and patio containers, there’s no reason not to get your hands dirty.

Gardening takes some skill, but the seeds, soil, earthworms, microbes, rain and sun do most of the work.

Ellen LaConte is author of “Life Rules” (Green Horizon, 2010). For more information, visit www.ellenlaconte.com.

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