Fri02122016

News

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues

SPLAT targets data, outreach as airplane noise continues


Graphic courtesy of Don Gardner
Activists claim that a new SFO flight path leaves a “sound shadow” that impacts Los Altos and Los Altos Hills.

Sky Posse Los Altos Team – more simply known as SPLAT – seeks to squelch the noise...

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Schools

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'

Los Altos High student-run charity plans '5 Gallon Gala'


Courtesy of Lia Evard
Water by Youth members gave Egan students a chance to carry a 40-pound Jerry can, to see how difficult it is to obtain water in developing nations.

Water by Youth, a club at Los Altos High School, is making a splash by pla...

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Community

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage

What would you do with a box of cookies? Local Girls Scouts help Tanzanian orphanage


Courtesy of Alicia Madden
Sales of local Girl Scout cookies support service projects, such as funding an orphanage in the village of Mto wa Mbu in Tanzania.

Girl Scout cookies – whether you think of them as a treat, a tradition or a diet comp...

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Sports

Scoreless spells sink LA boys

Scoreless spells sink LA boys


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos High point guard Nolan Brennan attempts a shot in Friday’s game versus Palo Alto. He scored eight points in the loss.

There have been several games this season in which the Los Altos High boys basketball t...

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Comment

New 'York' values

New 'York' values


Hughes

 

As we have witnessed California suffer through one of its worst droughts in history over the past few years, all of us, I’m sure, have been keenly aware of our surroundings and have done a small part in trying to conserve wa...

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Special Sections

Getting a charge  out of the Volt

Getting a charge out of the Volt


Courtesy of Chevrolet
The 2016 Chevrolet Volt can be driven up to 50 miles on the power stored in its batteries.

Just five years ago, we wondered in this column what the power supply would be for the car of the future. Gasoline, diesel, electric ba...

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Business

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats

Nearing V-Day: Shops stock sweets, treats


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Los Altos resident Ella Roosakos, 11, with her mother, Gail, puzzles over which Gourmet Works sweets to buy as a valentine for Ella’s friend.

The gift-buying rush isn’t exclusive to Christmas. It may jump over...

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People

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

ALAN RODNEY MILLS

Alan Rodney Mills, PhD, 83, of Los Altos passed away peacefully on Saturday, January 30th, 2016. He was born in Rochdale, England in 1933 and came to California in 1962. He was a proud alumni of Manchester Grammar in England, University of Liverpoo...

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Stepping Out

PYT 'Gets Famous'

PYT 'Gets Famous'


Lyn Flaim Healy/Spotlight Moments Photography
Renee Vetter of Palo Alto, left, and Megan Foreman of Los Altos star in Peninsula Youth Theatre’s “Judy Moody Gets Famous.” Performances are scheduled Friday and Saturday.

Peninsula...

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Spiritual Life

A time to prepare: Fasting for Lent isn't limited to food

 

Today is Ash Wednesday, which in the Christian calendar marks the beginning of Lent – the 40 days of preparation for Resurrection Sunday, otherwise known as Easter.

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Inside Mountain View

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters

New right-to-lease ordinance promises relief for renters


Mountain View Tenants Coalition/Facebook
Residents gather in the fall to protest Mountain View’s rising rents. Rent relief is on the way in the form of a new ordinance.

A controversial Mountain View law requiring landlords to provide lease opt...

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School fashion dials down as temperatures drop

In this stylish town, no one is too young for fashion. From toddlers to teens, kids go to school in high style, although their parents might wonder how high style can be so casual.

You may be relieved to know that this year's back-to-school fashions are somewhat conservative. Skirts are getting a little bit longer. (If they had gotten any shorter, they would have been belts.) Classic styles like pleated skirts and argyle vests are coming back in updated colors such as lime green and hot pink.

Don't get your hopes too high for conservative-looking children. There is a trend toward going to school in "lazy day" clothes. When students are feeling lazy, they might go to school in an outfit similar to one they sleep in - sweat pants or unstructured shorts.

"Girls on lazy days wear something comfortable," said Egan Junior High School student Kendra Cavaney. "When you want to dress up, you wear a skirt or jeans. For many guys, whatever they find in their drawer, they wear."

Egan student Haley Sugimoto added, "If girls want to look good, they might wear jewelry to make their clothes stand out or makeup to make their face stand out. People are unique in their own clothing style."

Estimates predict that back-to-school spending across the country will exceed the $13 billion mark, with a little less than half of that spent on clothing and accessories for kids.

"Transitioning from summer vacation to back-to-school mode can be challenging for both parents and children," said Pamela Wallack, executive vice president of GapKids and a mother of three. "By mixing back-to-school basics with new trends in denim and active wear, kids can affordably use fashion as a positive way to express their creativity and individuality."

Trends this year include:

• Darker, narrower jeans with embroidery.

• Longer, narrower Bermuda shorts that hit the knee.

• Slightly longer skirts.

• Graphic designs and patterns on T-shirts.

• Pockets designed specifically for cell phones and other electronics.

• Skirts and nice slacks for dressy days.

Layering is an enduring trend. "The layered look now might mean wearing two tank tops and a hoodie," said Lauren Pye, sales associate at Kids Only in downtown Los Altos. "Also, we are seeing more of the retro look, like hoop earrings, bright colors and prints from the '60s, and polka dots. Paul Frank prints are big this year."

Los Altos is fortunate to have three fine children's clothing stores, all located on Main Street between Second and Third streets. Kids Only, Young Villagers and Marion Jackstons serve infants through preteens.

"People are moving away from primary colors, toward bold colors like lime green or orange, or even black," said Linda Cecil, owner of Young Villagers. "These colors have been popular in Europe for a long time, but Americans are just now accepting them in children's clothes. We are seeing new color combinations like brown with pink or sky blue.

"Our customers, in the high-end market, want their kids to be unique - trendy, but classy, not flashy."

Beth Miller, owner of Marion Jackstons since 1990, said, "For 7-16 girls, styles are tending to lean back to the classics - fewer spaghetti straps, more age-appropriate dressing.

"Plaid skirts are now big for girls, too. The Roxy brand is very popular. It's wearable, trendy.

"Kids want to be fashionable, but they still want to be comfortable, with Lycra in pants or knit."

StatePoint Media contributed to this article.

For more information, visit or call Kids Only, 248 Main St., 947-0699; Marion Jackstons, 222 Main St., 948-0948; Young Villagers, 205 Main St., 948-2856.

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