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News

Safeway escalator elicits safety concerns from customers

Safeway escalator elicits safety concerns from customers


MEGAN V. WINSLOW/Town Crier
The escalator at the Safeway on First Street poses a safety hazard, some customers allege.

A Safeway shopper who accidentally placed his cart last month on the customer escalator instead of the shopping cart track next to...

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Schools

Los Altos High hosts 30th Writers Week

Los Altos High hosts 30th Writers Week


Above Photo by Traci Newell/Town Crier;
Author Jack Andraka shares his story with fellow high school seniors during Los Altos High School’s Writers Week last week.

Los Altos High School students learned firsthand last week how professionals ...

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Community

Service dogs bring smiles, comfort to veterans at Foothill College center

Service dogs bring smiles, comfort to veterans at Foothill College center


Photos by Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
Charles Viajar, student and U.S. Navy veteran, brings his four-legged companion Bruno to the Veterans Resource Center at Foothill College. Bruno, a 2-year-old Imperial Shih Tzu, is trained to assist Viajar with...

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Sports

Improbable run to NorCal semis saves season for St. Francis girls

Improbable run to NorCal semis saves season for St. Francis girls


Megan V. Winslow/Town Crier
St. Francis High’s Daisha Abdelkader goes on a fast break in the CCS Division II final. The senior point guard scored eight points in the Lancers’ NorCal semifinal loss to Dublin last week.

Senior Daisha Abdel...

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Comment

We'll buy it; what is it? Editorial

Would you buy a device on the condition that you are kept in the dark about how it works? Would you feel good about purchasing such a device when the contract even calls for nondisclosure of the nondisclosure form that keeps the device top secret?

T...

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Special Sections

MV resident, engineer applies brainpower to screenplays

MV resident, engineer applies brainpower to screenplays


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
High-tech vice president by day, screenwriter by night, Mountain View resident Robert Frostholm pursues his passion for storytelling.

Robert Frostholm has always been a storyteller.

Until a couple of years ago, however, hi...

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Business

Vintage Bath changes hands as new owners add twist to classic offerings

Vintage Bath changes hands as new owners add twist to classic offerings


Alicia Castro/Town Crier
Vintage Bath, the downtown Los Altos showroom, is under new leadership. Taking over are, from left, co-owners Jerry Rudick and Deena Castello and marketing and visual director Alissa McDonald.

Deena Castello – the new cu...

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Books

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff

'Pope Joan' Book weaves tale around legend of female pontiff


The idea that there may have a female pope at one time in history has generated much speculation throughout the centuries. “Pope Joan” (Crown, 1996) by Donna Woolfolk Cross, does not answer the question; rather, the author has created a detai...

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People

BEVERLEY JEANE (DORSEY) MCCHESNEY

BEVERLEY JEANE (DORSEY) MCCHESNEY

1944-2014

Beverley McChesney passed away at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View, CA on Sunday, Nov. 16. She had been fighting cancer for about 23 years until it went into her lungs.

She is survived by her husband David, of Cloverdale; her sisters...

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Travel

Eat, hike, soak: Cavallo Point Lodge offers Marin experience

Eat, hike, soak: Cavallo Point Lodge offers Marin experience


Eren Göknar/ Town Crier
Cavallo Point Lodge comprises former U.S. Army buildings, like the Mission Blue Chapel, repurposed for guests seeking a luxurious getaway.

It used to be a place where batteries of soldiers lived, with officers’ quarter...

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Stepping Out

Cal Pops performs Sunday at Foothill

Cal Pops performs Sunday at Foothill


Courtesy of Cal Pops
The Cal Pops trumpet section includes Dean Boysen, from left, Bob Runnels and Noel Weidkamp.

The California Pops Orchestra is scheduled to perform “Swing Time!” – a musical tour of Big Band hits from the 1930...

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Spiritual Life

Oshman JCC hosts panel on Judaism and Science

The Oshman Family Jewish Community Center has scheduled its inaugural Judaism and Science Symposium, “An Exploration of the Convergence of Jewish & Scientific Thought,” 5 p.m. April 12 at the JCC’s Schultz Cultural Arts Hall, 39...

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Magazine

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm

Food for thought: Hidden Villa programs offer teens training in sustainability on the farm


/Town Crier It’s not all cute and cuddly for teens participating in the eight-week Animal Husbandry Apprenticeship program at Hidden Villa in Los Altos Hills. Mia Mosing of Palo Alto, left, and Sophia Jackson of Los Altos clean the pigpens – one of...

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Resident witnesses Boston Marathon bombings


Photo By: Courtesy of Bob Anderson’s ujena fit club
Photo Courtesy Of Bob Anderson’S Ujena Fit Club

Bob Anderson of Los Altos competes in his first Boston Marathon, which was marred by bombings.

Longtime Los Altos resident Bob Anderson isn’t likely to forget his first chance to compete in the Boston Marathon – certainly not when that first time was April 15.

Anderson, a 43-year Los Altos resident, was a block past the finish line, picking up his competitor’s medal, when the first of two homemade pressure-cooker bombs exploded.

The explosions injured more than 180 people and killed three – 8-year-old Martin Richard, 29-year-old Krystle Campbell and Boston University graduate student Lingzu Lu. Bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, was captured Friday evening, ending a tense 24-hour period that effectively shut down the Boston metropolitan area as authorities searched for him and his brother, 26-year-old Tamerlan Tsarnaev. The elder sibling died early Friday morning during a shootout with federal and local law enforcement personnel.

“The sound, the smoke – people just didn’t know what was going on,” said Anderson, founder of Runner’s World magazine (launched in the late 1960s), describing the scene. “It was just unbelievable. … Nobody had any answers. It was a situation where it wasn’t clear what was going on. Nobody could’ve ever imagined something like this could happen at the Boston Marathon.”

Anderson, 65, said his thoughts immediately shifted to finding his son Michael, who competed in the marathon for the first time as well. Seeking some confirmation that his son was safe, Anderson made his way to a bag drop-off area for competitors and asked a local marathon official if his son had retrieved his belongings.

“It appeared that he did,” said Anderson, one of nine Los Altos residents registered to compete in the 2013 marathon. “Literally, I was almost shaking asking the question.”

Anderson returned to his hotel and reunited with his wife, who had been taking photos at the finish line but left the area before the blasts. She had been in contact with Michael and knew that he was unharmed.

They also learned that their son finished only 3 minutes before the first bomb detonated, leading to an emotional reunion at their hotel later that day.

“It was just the unknown – not knowing what was going on,” Anderson said in describing the tension as he searched for his son. “(The reunion) was quite emotional.”

Anderson noted that the weekend leading up to the marathon was a celebratory time, with “total strangers telling me, ‘Good luck tomorrow.’ Everyone was just so excited.”

Those positive feelings continued during the early stages of the race, he added, as Bostonians and other spectators lined the course, offering support to the competitors.

“It was such a great weekend, with so much joy in the air,” Anderson said. “There were kids giving you high-fives and handing out water to runners. … In my mind, it’s the same as someone putting a bomb in a church. For this to happen at that moment and to put (bombs) in the crowd, it’s just terrible.”

Tragedy on multiple fronts

Anderson, who returned home with family the day after the marathon, said his thoughts have since turned to those affected by the tragedy.

“The fact of the matter is, we should be totally happy and focused on what we did,” said Anderson, who is shooting a full-length documentary on his 50 years as a marathon runner.

The conclusion of the documentary, he added, was slated to include footage of his experience at the Boston Marathon.

“Obviously, our hearts go out to the victims,” he said. “It’s just so tragic.”

He noted that the April 15 event in Boston this year is a tragedy in more than one way. While expressing sorrow for those killed and injured, Anderson said the bombing was unfortunate from an athletic perspective as well. Many marathon runners spend years training for the opportunity to compete in the event – and may never get a second chance.

“This is one of the most prestigious (athletic) events in the world,” he said. “Obviously the real victims are the ones killed and injured. … At the same time, there were people there from all over the world and this may have been their only chance to compete in the Boston Marathon.”

Resolve

Anderson wasn’t the only runner in Los Altos with his thoughts trained on the bombing victims.

Like others on April 15, Adam Kemist – owner of On Your Mark at 378 Main St. – said his gaze was trained on his TV set watching national news coverage of the event. Seeing the tragedy unfold from the other side of the country, he added, initially left him with a helpless feeling.

“It brought back the same feelings I had with 9/11 – the Twin Towers,” said Kemist, who attended the Boston Marathon as a spectator in 2002. “I’m sitting here asking, ‘What do we do?’ You sit here on the other coast and all you really do is sit and watch.”

Sitting and watching quickly turned into a call for action. Kemist and his wife, Micheline, contacted friends and regular customers to organize a 3-mile tribute run last Thursday in honor of the victims.

Close to 20 runners – some donning Boston Red Sox hats, others wearing New England Patriots jerseys – participated in the run, a loop that started at Kemist’s storefront and wound down First Street and Los Altos Avenue. Participants included members of the Homestead High Track & Field team.

The Kemists took part in a nationwide 4.09-mile run Monday – the time on the marathon clock when the first of two bombs exploded – along with members of the Los Altos High Track & Field team.

Participants collected donations at the events, which Kemist said he would direct to funds established for victims and their families, including 11-year-old Aaron Hern of Martinez. The total amount was not available by the Town Crier’s deadline.

As for Anderson, who along with his family participated in Kemist’s 3-mile tribute run Thursday, the bombing has only strengthened his resolve to show his support for the marathon in the future.

“It just gives me more reasons to support a race like the Boston Marathon,” he said. “In my mind, I’m not going to give those who did this any more power than they’ve already gotten. They’re not going to rob that from me.”

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